Subscribe Thang

Ran into Charles at the Draught Draft Horse House, and he said he didn’t read my blog much because I have no RSS feed to subscribe to. I do, but it’s hidden at the bottom of the page where it’s easier to not get to it.

I set up a link at the left, there, to subscribe to this blaaauuhhhgghhgag.

Enjoyarama.

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Published in: on October 31, 2007 at 7:21 pm  Leave a Comment  

Subscribe Thang

Ran into Charles at the Draught Draft Horse House, and he said he didn’t read my blog much because I have no RSS feed to subscribe to. I do, but it’s hidden at the bottom of the page where it’s easier to not get to it.

I set up a link at the left, there, to subscribe to this blaaauuhhhgghhgag.

Enjoyarama.

Published in: on October 31, 2007 at 7:21 pm  Leave a Comment  

All Things Being Practically One

I was helping Franc out with her math homework, and we somehow got to talking about pi, and how it goes on forever. Meaning, if you measure around a circle (circumference), then measure the line down the middle (diameter), and divide one by the other, you get an irrational, transcendental answer – a number that goes on forever.

Mmmmm. Pi.

That’s a neat word trick, but for practical purposes, measuring things to the 39th decimal place of pi gives you a measurement accurate to the size of a hydrogen atom. Good enough for government work.

Later that night, I was teased by the thought that even for non-practical purposes, pi’s value might not actually calculate, without pattern or end, to infinity. Which reminded me of a post on the Futility Closet, which proved that 0.999… is the same as one. Not close to one: they have the same value.

a = 0.999…
10a = 9.999…
10a – a = 9.999… – 0.999…
9a = 9
a = 1

For all practical purposes, ceteris paribus , tat tvam asi, yar.

It’s not obvious. But it is true.

Published in: on October 24, 2007 at 8:18 pm  Leave a Comment  

All Things Being Practically One

I was helping Franc out with her math homework, and we somehow got to talking about pi, and how it goes on forever. Meaning, if you measure around a circle (circumference), then measure the line down the middle (diameter), and divide one by the other, you get an irrational, transcendental answer – a number that goes on forever.

Mmmmm. Pi.

That’s a neat word trick, but for practical purposes, measuring things to the 39th decimal place of pi gives you a measurement accurate to the size of a hydrogen atom. Good enough for government work.

Later that night, I was teased by the thought that even for non-practical purposes, pi’s value might not actually calculate, without pattern or end, to infinity. Which reminded me of a post on the Futility Closet, which proved that 0.999… is the same as one. Not close to one: they have the same value.

a = 0.999…
10a = 9.999…
10a – a = 9.999… – 0.999…
9a = 9
a = 1

For all practical purposes, ceteris paribus , tat tvam asi, yar.

It’s not obvious. But it is true.

Published in: on October 24, 2007 at 8:18 pm  Leave a Comment  

I Am He (And You Can Too)

Please go see this animated short. It broke my heart, and then my mind, and I hope it does yours, too.

Laith Bahrani wrote:
“Creep was created as an extension to a series of shorts called `Low Morale’ which I began to develop during a well-paid, comfortable yet soul-destroying job as a senior designer in a multimedia agency. The countless days spent in the run down converted office, churning out banal multimedia and animation for faceless, lifeless, clueless blue chips had taken their toll on my soul. Creep became my creative escape tunnel.”

Published in: on October 23, 2007 at 3:09 pm  Leave a Comment  

Cool New Side Gig


Colleen Kane has a “reading is fun for mentals” link list, where I discovered Mandy Stadtmiller (could YOU resist clicking on “Bloggy McBlogalot?”). She’s a reporter for the New York Post, and a stand-up comedian. She won last year’s “NY’s Funniest Reporter” award at the Underground Comedy Festival. She has stand-up videos on MySpace. Then she started getting more famous, plus scored a book deal, plus her own Sex and the City-esque column for the Post, and around September I noticed her site wasn’t being updated very often.
Last week, I was tidying my bookmarks, and tried again. That day’s entry said this:

“Hello,
You may have noticed I am behind. On posting things. Yes, it’s true.
So here’s a query.
Basically, I’m looking for an intern-type person to help me out with posting articles and shows and doing other not super-glamorous tasks that I fall quickly behind on.
If you’re an aspiring writer or performer or just dig some of my stuff and have free time at work, this would be right for you.
I’ve worked with both paid and unpaid people who’ve helped in the past. Right now I can’t pay but I can provide a bit of experience, insight and future recommendations. Ideally you’d be in New York, but if you’re not, it can be done remotely.
If this sounds interesting, please shoot me a one-paragraph email to mstadtmiller at myemail dot com about who you are and why this sounds like something that would appeal to you.”

Well, I’m a writer and amateur performer, so what the hoo-ha, I wrote her a paragraph. Nothing ventured, and all.

Figuring my email would get buried in the avalanche, I did NOT expect to hear from her the next day. After phone/text/email tagging, we talked yesterday evening, and I got my first assignment, which I knocked out right quick.

How fun is this? Oh, did I mention she’s this totally warm, authentic person who is just sincerely generous, and willing to help however she can? Which is fantastic, but also weighty, because now I can’t procrastinate on this book a minute longer. So much for the days of slack and Austin music. I have work to present.

Here was today’s Bloggy McBlogalot post:

“A few quick things:

1) Have found two delightful folks to help out and who I can help out. So awesome.

2) Set your Tivos for “Rock Band Band” on Nov. 11 on VH-1. It’s funny. I play myself. Meta.

3) Did you know that even though I’m a Lazy Susan and haven’t been posting my column here that you can keep up with it by checking out archives here? It’s true. Cool.

4) I’m in the semi-finals for New York’s Funniest Stand-Up.”

So, apparently I’m one of those delightfuls. How very, very, very. Pretty sure shite like this doesn’t happen to people every day. Nice to get a break once in awhile. Ol’ Bloggy there is right: sometimes life feels so good you just want to punch it in the face.

Published in: on October 22, 2007 at 8:49 pm  Leave a Comment  

Cool New Side Gig


Colleen Kane has a “reading is fun for mentals” link list, where I discovered Mandy Stadtmiller (could YOU resist clicking on “Bloggy McBlogalot?”). She’s a reporter for the New York Post, and a stand-up comedian. She won last year’s “NY’s Funniest Reporter” award at the Underground Comedy Festival. She has stand-up videos on MySpace. Then she started getting more famous, plus scored a book deal, plus her own Sex and the City-esque column for the Post, and around September I noticed her site wasn’t being updated very often.
Last week, I was tidying my bookmarks, and tried again. That day’s entry said this:

“Hello,
You may have noticed I am behind. On posting things. Yes, it’s true.
So here’s a query.
Basically, I’m looking for an intern-type person to help me out with posting articles and shows and doing other not super-glamorous tasks that I fall quickly behind on.
If you’re an aspiring writer or performer or just dig some of my stuff and have free time at work, this would be right for you.
I’ve worked with both paid and unpaid people who’ve helped in the past. Right now I can’t pay but I can provide a bit of experience, insight and future recommendations. Ideally you’d be in New York, but if you’re not, it can be done remotely.
If this sounds interesting, please shoot me a one-paragraph email to mstadtmiller at myemail dot com about who you are and why this sounds like something that would appeal to you.”

Well, I’m a writer and amateur performer, so what the hoo-ha, I wrote her a paragraph. Nothing ventured, and all.

Figuring my email would get buried in the avalanche, I did NOT expect to hear from her the next day. After phone/text/email tagging, we talked yesterday evening, and I got my first assignment, which I knocked out right quick.

How fun is this? Oh, did I mention she’s this totally warm, authentic person who is just sincerely generous, and willing to help however she can? Which is fantastic, but also weighty, because now I can’t procrastinate on this book a minute longer. So much for the days of slack and Austin music. I have work to present.

Here was today’s Bloggy McBlogalot post:

“A few quick things:

1) Have found two delightful folks to help out and who I can help out. So awesome.

2) Set your Tivos for “Rock Band Band” on Nov. 11 on VH-1. It’s funny. I play myself. Meta.

3) Did you know that even though I’m a Lazy Susan and haven’t been posting my column here that you can keep up with it by checking out archives here? It’s true. Cool.

4) I’m in the semi-finals for New York’s Funniest Stand-Up.”

So, apparently I’m one of those delightfuls. How very, very, very. Pretty sure shite like this doesn’t happen to people every day. Nice to get a break once in awhile. Ol’ Bloggy there is right: sometimes life feels so good you just want to punch it in the face.

Published in: on October 22, 2007 at 8:49 pm  Leave a Comment  

No Future in Industrial Beer

Miller and Coors became the same company last week, which means they now control 30% of the beer market, leaving the “micro” brewers to supply 2 out of 10 American beers (Budweiser sells half of the beer bought in the US, mostly Bud Lite). Ten years ago when I brewed for Austin’s Hill Country Brewery, we were one of about a hundred US craft breweries. Now there are 15 times that many, and sales climb every year.

Over there in Brooklyn, Garret Oliver cranks out some of the most delicious beer in the world (he’s a regular winner of GABF medals). He guest Op-Eded in the NYT today, and this article pops.
Photo: David Shankbone

Don’t Fear Big Beer

By GARRETT OLIVER
Published in the New York Times: October 19, 2007
JUST 10 years ago, the proposed merger of SABMiller and Molson Coors into MillerCoors would have worried craft brewers. Back then, “American beer” was thought of as a cheap product with very little beer flavor. But today the United States has by far the most exciting beer culture in the world, and America’s 1,500 craft brewers are undaunted by the prospect of a juggernaut that would have 30 percent of the domestic market. The age of American industrial brewing is over.

Craft brewers used to be called “microbreweries,” but many of us are not so micro anymore. And the people who once thought the craft brewing movement was a fad can now see it for what it really is — a welcome return to normality.
More >>

Published in: on October 19, 2007 at 4:32 pm  Leave a Comment  

No Future in Industrial Beer

Miller and Coors became the same company last week, which means they now control 30% of the beer market, leaving the “micro” brewers to supply 2 out of 10 American beers (Budweiser sells half of the beer bought in the US, mostly Bud Lite). Ten years ago when I brewed for Austin’s Hill Country Brewery, we were one of about a hundred US craft breweries. Now there are 15 times that many, and sales climb every year.

Over there in Brooklyn, Garret Oliver cranks out some of the most delicious beer in the world (he’s a regular winner of GABF medals). He guest Op-Eded in the NYT today, and this article pops.
Photo: David Shankbone

Don’t Fear Big Beer

By GARRETT OLIVER
Published in the New York Times: October 19, 2007
JUST 10 years ago, the proposed merger of SABMiller and Molson Coors into MillerCoors would have worried craft brewers. Back then, “American beer” was thought of as a cheap product with very little beer flavor. But today the United States has by far the most exciting beer culture in the world, and America’s 1,500 craft brewers are undaunted by the prospect of a juggernaut that would have 30 percent of the domestic market. The age of American industrial brewing is over.

Craft brewers used to be called “microbreweries,” but many of us are not so micro anymore. And the people who once thought the craft brewing movement was a fad can now see it for what it really is — a welcome return to normality.
More >>

Published in: on October 19, 2007 at 4:32 pm  Leave a Comment  

Lala’s Play Opens Tonight – Go See It


Here’s her writeup on the ACC Newsroom:

Drama highlights talent-packed fall arts season

Director/filmmaker Laura Somers will helm the Drama Department’s fall production as part of the Arts and Humanities Division’s upcoming season.

The division has organized a full schedule of events. Among them is “Far Away,” featuring Somers as guest director. The former Austin resident helped found the dirigo group theater company before moving to Los Angeles.

“While ‘Far Away’ is a somewhat mysterious play, I believe that when audiences leave, they will be thinking about it for many days to come,” said Drama Department Chair Shelby Brammer. The play runs two weekends in October.

The Press Release:

The Austin Community College Drama Department will open its 2007-2008 season with Caryl Churchill’s FAR AWAY. Directed by guest director, Laura Somers and featuring Equity member and ACC faculty Jodi Jinks, Far Away, opens Friday, Oct. 19th in the Gallery Theater, 3rd Floor, Rio Grande Campus at 12th and Rio Grande in downtown Austin. The show runs Oct. 19th, 20th, & 21st, and Oct. 26th, 27th, & 28th. Friday and Saturday performances are at 8 p.m., and Sundays are at 2 p.m. Admission is by donation, though limited open seating with be available as a part of the TCG/ACot Free Night of Theater project for the October 20th performance.

“Far Away” is a gripping hour-long play that packs the substance of several full length dramas. Essentially an apocalyptic play about an Armageddon created by its own victims, it provides a searing contrast between the world we treasure and the horror we have made of it. Poetic yet beautifully simple, it observes a time both near and “far away” when the developed nations are no longer just fighting against themselves, but against the world itself.


Published in: on October 18, 2007 at 8:00 pm  Leave a Comment